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birth control guide

Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)


birth control guide

implanted devices

hormonal methods

sperm barrier methods

emergency contraception

permanent methods for men

permanent methods for women


        Permanent Methods For Women:
They are for women who are sure they never want to have a child or do not want any more children.
Reversals require complicated surgery. Even though tubes can sometimes be rejoined, there are no guarantees.
For many women, reversals are not possible because there is not enough of their tubes left to reconnect.

Sterilization Surgery for Women: Trans-abdominal Surgical Sterilization/Surgical Implant
What is it?
-- a device is placed on the outside of each fallopian tube. The woman's fallopian tubes are blocked so the egg and sperm can not meet in the fallopian tube. This stops you from getting pregnant.
How does it work?
-- one way is by tying and cutting the tubes this is called tubal ligation. The fallopian tubes also can be sealed using an instrument with an electrical current. They also can be closed with clips, clamps, or rings. Sometimes, a small piece of the tube is removed.
-- you will need a small cut (incision) below the belly button and 2 or more smaller cuts (incisions)
-- the woman's fallopian tubes are blocked so the egg and sperm can not meet in the fallopian tube. This stops you from getting pregnant.
-- this is a surgery a woman has only once.
-- it is permanent.
How do I get it?
-- this is a surgery you ask for. You will need a small incision (cut) below the belly button and 2 or more smaller incisions (cuts)
Some risks?
-- pain, bleeding.
-- infection or other complications after surgery.
-- ectopic (tubal) pregnancy.
Does it protect me from sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?
-- no.

Sterilization Implant for Women: Transcervical Surgical Sterilization Implant
What is it?
-- small flexible, metal coil that is put into the fallopian tubes through the vagina.
How does it work?
-- the coils are put inside the fallopian tubes with a special catheter. Since it is inserted through the vagina, you do not need an incision (cutting)
-- you may need local anesthesia.
-- scar tissue forms around the coil. This blocks the fallopian tubes and stops you from getting pregnant.
-- you need to use another birth control method during the first 3 months. You will need an X-ray to make sure the device is in the right place.
-- it is permanent.
How do I get it?
-- this is a surgery you ask for.
Some risks?
-- mild to moderate pain after insertion.
-- ectopic (tubal) pregnancy.
Does it protect me from sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?
-- no.



www.takerx.com
2006