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birth control guide

Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)


birth control guide

implanted devices

hormonal methods

sperm barrier methods

emergency contraception

permanent methods for men

permanent methods for women


        Implanted Devices:
They are inserted into the body and can be kept in place for a few years.
Examples of implanted devices:
Copper IUD, IUD with Progestin, Implantable Rod, Implanon and Nexplanon.

Copper IUD (intrauterine device):
What is it?
-- a T-shaped device that is put into the uterus by a healthcare provider.
How does it work?
-- the copper IUD affects the way sperm move, and stops them from traveling to the egg.
-- it also changes the lining of the uterus, making it harder for an egg to attach.
-- the copper IUD can stay in place for 12 years.
-- after the IUD is taken out, it is possible to get pregnant.
How do I get it?
-- a doctor or other healthcare provider needs to put in the IUD.
Some side effects?
-- cramps and irregular bleeding.
Uncommon risks?
-- pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility.
Rare risk?
-- tear in the uterus or cervix.
Does it protect me from sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?
-- no.

IUD with Progestin:
What is it?
-- a T-shaped device that is put into the uterus by a healthcare provider.
How do I get it?
-- a doctor or other healthcare provider needs to put in the IUD.
How does it work?
-- it may thicken the mucus of your cervix, and thin the lining of your uterus, which makes it harder for the sperm to travel to the egg.
-- it may make it harder for sperm to move and survive.
-- the IUD with progestin can stay in place for 5 years.
-- after the IUD is taken out, it is possible to get pregnant.
Some side effects?
-- cramps and irregular bleeding.
Uncommon risks?
-- pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility.
Rare risk?
-- tear in the uterus or cervix.
Does it protect me from sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?
-- no.

Implantable Rod:
What is it?
-- a thin, matchstick-sized rod that contains the hormone progestin.
How does it work?
-- it thickens the cervical mucus, which keeps sperm from joining with the egg.
-- less often, it stops the ovaries from releasing eggs.
-- it lasts up to 3 years.
How do I get it?
-- a doctor or nurse needs to put it under the skin of your arm.
-- you will get a shot in the upper arm to make the skin numb, then the rod is placed just under the skin with a needle.
Chance of getting pregnant?
-- out of 100 women who use this method for one year, less than 1 may get pregnant.
-- it might not work as well for overweight or obese women.
-- it might not work as well if you are taking certain medicines for things like: tuberculosis (TB), seizures, depression or HIV/AIDS.
-- tell your doctor if you are taking the herb St. John's Wort.
Some risks?
-- acne, weight gain, cysts of the ovaries, mood changes, depression, hair loss, headache.
-- upset stomach, dizziness, lower interest in sexual activity, sore breasts, and changes in your periods.
Does it protect me from sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?
-- no.



www.takerx.com
2006