www.TakeRx.com

www.TakeRx.com



birth control guide

Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)


birth control guide

implanted devices

hormonal methods

spermicide methods

emergency contraception

permanent methods for men

permanent methods for women

        Spermicide Methods:
They put up a block, which keeps the sperm from reaching the egg. Here are six approved methods:
male condom (latex or polyurethane), female condom, diaphragm with spermicide, sponge with spermicide, cervical cap with spermicide, spermicide alone.

The Male Condom (latex or polyurethane):
What is it?
-- a thin film sheath placed over the erect penis.
-- it can be made of latex or polyurethane.
How does it work?
-- it puts up a block to stop the sperm from traveling to the egg.
-- put it on the erect penis right before sex.
-- use it only once and then throw it away.
-- pull out before the penis softens.
-- hold the condom against the base of the penis before pulling out.
How do I get it?
-- you do not need a prescription.
-- you can buy it over-the-counter.
Chance of getting pregnant?
-- out of 100 women who use this method for one year, 11-16 may get pregnant.
Some risks?
-- irritation
-- allergic reactions (if you are allergic to latex, you can try condoms made of polyurethane)
Does it protect me from sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?
-- latex condoms are the best protection against HIV/AIDS and other STIs.
-- condoms are the only contraceptive product that may protect against most sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

The Female Condom:
What is it?
-- a lubricated, thin polyurethane pouch that is put into the vagina.
How does it work?
-- it puts up a block to stop sperm from traveling to the egg.
-- put the female condom into the vagina right before sex.
-- use it only once and then throw it away.
-- you need a new female condom each time you have sex.
How do I get it?
-- you do not need a prescription.
-- you can buy it over-the-counter.
Chance of getting pregnant?
-- out of 100 women who use this method for one year, about 20 may get pregnant.
Some risks?
-- irritation
-- allergic reactions may happen
Does it protect me from sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?
-- may give some protection against STIs.
-- not as effective as latex condoms.
-- more research is needed.

The Diaphragm with Spermicide:
What is it?
-- a dome-shaped flexible disk with a flexible rim.
-- made from latex rubber or silicone.
How does it work?
-- it covers the cervix so that sperm cannot travel to the egg.
-- you need to put spermicidal jelly on the inside of the diaphragm before putting it into the vagina.
-- you must put the diaphragm into the vagina before having sex.
-- you must leave the diaphragm in place at least 6 hours after having sex.
-- it can be left in place for up to 24 hours. You need to use more spermicide every time you have sex.
How do I get it?
-- you need a prescription.
-- a doctor or nurse will need to do an exam to find the right size diaphragm for you.
-- you should have the diaphragm checked after childbirth or if you lose more than 15 pounds, you might need a different size.
Chance of getting pregnant?
-- out of 100 women who use this method for one year, about 15 may get pregnant.
Some risks?
-- irritation, allergic reactions, and urinary tract infection.
-- if you keep it in place longer than 24 hours, there is a risk of toxic shock syndrome. Toxic shock is a rare but serious infection.
Does it protect me from sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?
-- no.

The Sponge with Spermicide:
What is it?
-- a disk-shaped polyurethane device with the spermicide nonoxynol-9.
How does it work?
-- the sponge covers the cervix and blocks sperm from traveling to meet the egg.
-- put it into the vagina before you have sex.
-- it protects for up to 24 hours. You do not need to use more spermicide each time you have sex.
-- you must leave the sponge in place for at least 6 hours after having sex.
-- you must take the sponge out within 30 hours after you put it in. Throw it away after you use it.
How do I get it?
-- you do not need a prescription.
-- you can buy it over-the-counter.
Chance of getting pregnant?
-- out of 100 women who use this method for one year, 16-32 may get pregnant.
-- it may not work as well for women who have given birth. Childbirth stretches the vagina and cervix and the sponge may not fit as well.
Some risks?
-- irritation and allergic reactions.
-- some women may have a hard time taking the sponge out.
-- if you keep it in place longer than 24-30 hours, there is a risk of toxic shock syndrome. Toxic shock is a rare but serious infection.
Does it protect me from sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?
-- no.

The Cervical Cap with Spermicide:
What is it?
-- a soft latex or silicone cup with a round rim, which fits snugly around the cervix.
How do I use it?
-- it covers the cervix so that sperm cannot travel to the egg.
-- you need to put spermicidal jelly inside the cap before you use it.
-- you must put the cap in the vagina before you have sex.
-- you may find it hard to put in.
-- you must leave the cap in place for at least 6 hours after having sex.
-- you may leave the cap in for up to 48 hours.
-- you do not need to use more spermicide each time you have sex.
How do I get it?
-- you need a prescription.
Chance of getting pregnant?
-- out of 100 women who use this method for one year, about 17-23 may get pregnant.
-- it may not work as well for women who have given birth. Childbirth stretches the vagina and cervix and the cap may not fit as well.
Some risks?
-- irritation, allergic reactions, and abnormal Pap test.
-- if you keep it in place longer than 48 hours, there is a risk of toxic shock syndrome. Toxic shock is a rare but serious infection.
Does it protect me from sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?
-- no.

The Spermicide Alone:
What is it?
-- a foam, cream, jelly, film, or tablet that you put into the vagina.
How does it work?
-- spermicide blocks the cervix, so sperm cannot travel to the egg.
-- it keeps sperm from moving, so sperm cannot travel to the egg.
-- instructions can be different for each type of spermicide. Read the label before you use it.
-- you need to put spermicide into the vagina between 5 and 90 minutes before you have sex.
-- you usually need to leave it in place at least 6 to 8 hours after; do not douche or rinse the vagina for at least 6 hours after sex.
How do I get it?
-- you do not need a prescription.
-- you can buy it over-the-counter.
Chance of getting pregnant?
-- out of 100 women who use this method for one year, about 30 may get pregnant.
-- different studies show different rates of effectiveness.
Some risks?
-- irritation, allergic reactions, urinary tract infection.
-- if you are also using a medicine for a vaginal yeast infection, the spermicide might not work as well.
Does it protect me from sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?
-- no.





www.takerx.com
2006